Cody LeCompte: Cuba Libre!


Cody, Danette in Cuba
   YESTERDAY, Danette LeCompte said in a Facebook posting that she had been told by Diane Finley, Canada's citizenship minister as well as LeCompte's local Member of Parliament, that "our dealing with the press is hurting our position." LeCompte's response to this statement? "We believe that had the press not been involved, nothing would have happened."
  Hard to argue. After weeks of Canadian government inaction while LeCompte's 19-year-old son, Cody, was detained in Cuba, recent media attention spurred another cabinet minister, Peter Kent, to call in Cuban officials to "express concern" about the lengthy investigation into an April car accident in which Cody was involved.
   That was yesterday. According to reports today, the LeComptes were called to a meeting at a Cuban police station at which they were told Cody will be able to leave as early as next week. The family posted bail of about $2,200 Cdn. and agreed that Cody would return for a trial, should one be ordered.


See also:



Comments

TonyR said…
Typical Cuban thinking.
AS soon as they become aware that it might hurt their bottom line by attracting less tourism, they act.
Of course the 75 people that they rounded up in 2003 were tried, convicted and sentenced in less than 2 weeks.
I think your blog went a long way to inform the public of what was going on. Good work!
Tourists really should stop renting vehicles in Cuba until they eliminate this draconian law. It's just not worth it.
Anonymous said…
The 75 people rounded up in 2003 are/were Cuban Nationals, a completely different scenario.
What should really happen is that EVERYONE should be aware of the laws and penalties that are possible in a country in which they visit or vacation. Those that often go to Cuba, or have friends and family there, know that this is one of the "least" of the draconian laws.
There are plenty of others that still are suffering in Cuban jails, both foreign and national, for NO REASON .. other than they did not have a good lawyer there, or they did not have the money.
As for the hotel bill's that Cody's mum has built up, if they've travelled there before (and if not, surely during this extended period of time), they could have been staying at a casa particular (private home) for a fraction of the cost.
Another thought that has crossed my mind was one of the articles mentions that a Cuban "female friend" was with them at the time of the accident - yet another draconian law, but "mingling with a Cuban" ... that can present HUGE problems.
Sandra
Caristas said…
Thanks, Tony -- I appreciate your comments. And Sandra, I suspect that the "mingling" aspect was a big factor in young Cody's detention. No question -- it's frowned upon.

Popular posts from this blog

Discovered in Cuba, a rare Mercedes bird

Unsafe assumptions: Where Toufik Benhamiche went wrong